Submitted by Cory Kibler, Director of Communications Ministries for the RMC.

 

Here’s something you already know: The Rocky Mountain Conference is BIG.

You can see this massive expanse of ministry for yourself when you take a look at our church map. There are tight clusters of churches up and down the front range in Colorado, and they disperse themselves for hundreds of miles in any direction, all the way out towns like Kanab, UT and Ft. Morgan, CO.

Regardless of the geographic challenges at hand, it’s our honor and duty to support each and every RMC community.

Sometimes, we’re able to connect with several churches at once, such as during the Association Leaders’ Meeting. When it comes to vitality, though, our work is best done in person, one church at a time. So much of our vitality relies on building unique relationships with each congregation, which is truly and fully realized when we are able to join hands and pray together before our work.

Last week, I took a long-overdue venture out West to visit churches along the I-15 Corridor in Northern Utah. The hub of this region is Salt Lake City, where I met with Holladay UCC during their midweek Community Dinner and Youth Group. Up North, I visited Congregational UCC in Ogden, just after their meeting on a community activism initiative. Nearby, at Bountiful Community Church, I spent several hours with energized staff and volunteers who are embarking on several exciting projects. Last but not least, I visited New Jerusalem EFKS down South in Midvale and spoke with Rev. Uamuli Su’a about his Samoan church’s role in the community, and how we can help.

Along with being the most productive way to connect, this face-to-face work is easily the most rewarding aspect of my role. I learn about people, and join their team to find creative, hands-on solutions. A Zoom meeting is great, but it can’t provide the same level of context and commitment. Being there with them allows us to better see their church through their eyes, and that matters a great deal.

I’m 100% convinced that the best way to work with people, in and out of church, is to foster a relationship with them. In the coming months and years, I plan to visit several more RMC churches—in the tight clusters and outer edges—to do just that.